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How to prepare if the UK leaves the EU with no deal

UK government's preparations for a 'no deal' scenario

The future relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union 

European Commission Draft Withdrawal Agreement on the withdrawal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland from the European Union and the European Atomic Energy Community.

Document

Brit_in_EU_3Million_Considerations-for-Phase-2_Jan2018

Brit_in_EU_Resumen_Comparecencia_ParlEur.pdf

8 December 2017. Joint report from the negotiators of the European Union and the United Kingdom Government.

22 September 2017. Prime Minister Theresa May. Transcript of the speech

ANNEX to the Recommendation for a COUNCIL DECISION 3.5.2017

Comunicado del embajador del Reino Unido en España a 29 de Marzo de 2017

Prime Ministers letter to European Council President Donald Tusk

PMs statement to the House of Commons

Eurocitizens: Coloquio sobre las implicaciones del Brexit

Recommendation for a COUNCIL DECISION authorising the Commission to open negotiations

https://ec.europa.eu/info/sites/info/files/recommendation-uk-eu-negotiations_3-may-2017_en.pdf

 

ANNEX to the Recommendation for a COUNCIL DECISION

https://ec.europa.eu/info/sites/info/files/annex-recommendation-uk-eu-negotiations_3-may-2017_en.pdf

Comunicado del Embajador del Reino Unido en España. 29 de marzo 2017

“One of our top priorities for the negotiations is our citizens, and there will be no immediate changes to expat rights here in Spain in the interim” says British Ambassador to Spain Simon Manley.

“Today the Prime Minister wrote to the European Council to trigger Article 50 and begin the process for the UK to leave the EU.  From the meetings that our teams across Spain have had in recent months, we know that many British residents in Spain have questions about the future, ranging from residency rights to healthcare and pensions.

One of our top priorities for the negotiations is our citizens.  As the Prime Minister said in her letter to European Council President, we should always put our citizens first, and we want an early agreement about their rights. We are ready to reach such an agreement right now if other countries agree. We want to give citizens as much certainty as possible, as early as possible.

In the interim, there will be no immediate changes to expat rights here in Spain. Until exit negotiations are concluded, the UK remains a full member of the European Union and all the rights British Nationals enjoy in Spain remain in force.

You can continue to live and work in Spain.  You can continue to access Spanish healthcare, access your UK pension and your children can continue to attend Spanish schools.  We encourage all British citizens residing in Spain to register on their local padron, so that you can fully exercise your rights to access local services in Spain and so that we have the most complete possible picture of all the British citizens are living here.  If you encounter any problems exercising your rights, get in touch with your nearest British consulate. Our teams across Spain and I will continue to keep you updated on the negotiations.  Please follow GOV.UK for the most up to date and accurate information.”

Prime Ministers letter to European Council President Donald Tusk

Transcription
10 DOWNING STREET LONDON SWlA 2AA
THE PRIME MINISTER 29 March 2017

Dear President Tusk
On 23 June last year, the people of the United Kingdom voted to leave the
European Union. As I have said before, that decision was no rejection of
the values we share as fellow Europeans. Nor was it an attempt to do harm
to the European Union or any of the remaining member states. On the contrary,
the United Kingdom wants the European Union to succeed and prosper.
Instead, the referendum was a vote to restore, as we see it, our national
self-determination. We are leaving the European Union, but we are not leaving
Europe -and we want to remain committed partners and allies to our friends
across the continent.

Earlier this month, the United Kingdom Parliament confirmed the result of the
referendum by voting with clear and convincing majorities in both of its Houses
for the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill. The Bill was passed
by Parliament on 13 March and it received Royal Assent from Her Majesty
The Queen and became an Act of Parliament on 16 March.

Today, therefore, I am writing to give effect to the democratic decision of the
people of the United Kingdom. I hereby notify the European Council in
accordance with Article 50(2) of the Treaty on European Union of the United
Kingdom's intention to withdraw from the European Union. In addition, in
accordance with the same Article 50(2) as applied by Article 106a of the
Treaty Establishing the European Atomic Energy Community, I hereby notify
the European Council of the United Kingdom's intention to withdraw from the
European Atomic Energy Community. References in this letter to the European
Union should therefore be taken to include a reference to the European Atomic
Energy Community.

1.
We should engage with one another constructively and respectfully, in
a spirit of sincere cooperation. Since I became Prime Minister of the
United Kingdom I have listened carefully to you, to my fellow EU Heads
of Government and the Presidents of the European Commission and
Parliament. That is why the United Kingdom does not seek membership
of the single market: we understand and respect your position that the four
freedoms of the single market are indivisible and there can be no "cherry
picking". We also understand that there will be consequences for the UK
of leaving the EU: we know that we will lose influence over the rules that
affect the European economy. We also know that UK companies will, as
they trade within the EU, have to align with rules agreed by institutions of
which we are no longer a part -just as UK companies do in other overseas
markets.
ii.
We should always put our citizens first. There is obvious complexity in
the discussions we are about to undertake, but we should remember that at
the heart of our talks are the interests of all our citizens. There are, for
example, many citizens of the remaining member states living in the
United Kingdom, and UK citizens living elsewhere in the European
Union, and we should aim to strike an early agreement about their rights.
iii. We should work towards securing a comprehensive agreement. We
want to agree a deep and special partnership between the UK and the EU,
taking in both economic and security cooperation. We will need to discuss
how we determine a fair settlement of the UK's rights and obligations as a
departing member state, in accordance with the law and in the spirit of the
United Kingdom's continuing partnership with the EU. But we believe it
is necessary to agree the terms of our future partnership alongside those of
our withdrawal from the EU.
iv. We should work together to minimise disruption and give as much
certainty as possible. Investors, businesses and citizens in both the UK
and across the remaining 27 member states -and those from third
countries around the world -want to be able to plan. In order to avoid any
cliff-edge as we move from our current relationship to our future
partnership, people and businesses in both the UK and the EU would
benefit from implementation periods to adjust in a smooth and orderly
way to new arrangements. It would help both sides to minimise
unnecessary disruption if we agree this principle early in the process.

The task before us

As I have aid, the Government of the United Kingdom wants to agree a deep
and special partnership between the UK and the EU, taking in both economic
and security cooperation. At a time when the growth of global trade is slowing

-and there are ign that protectionist instincts are on the ri e in many part of the
world, Europe has a responsibility to stand up for free trade in the interest of all
our citizens. Likewi e, Europe' security is more fragile today than at any time
since the end of the Cold War. Weakening our cooperation for the prosperity
and protection of our citizens would be a costly mistake. The United Kingdom s
objectives for our future paitner hip remain those set out in my Lancaster House
speech of 17 January and the subsequent White Paper published on 2 February.

We recognise that it will be a challenge to reach such a comprehensive
agreement within the two-year period set out for withdrawal discussions in the
Treaty. But we believe it is necessary to agree the terms of our future
partnership alongside those of our withdrawal from the EU. We start from a
unique position in these discussions -close regulatory alignment, trust in one
another's institutions, and a spirit of cooperation stretching back decades. It is
for these reasons, and because the future partnership between the UK and the
EU is of such importance to both sides, that I am sure it can be agreed in the
time period set out by the Treaty.

The task before us is momentous but it should not be beyond us. After all, the
institutions and the leaders of the European Union have succeeded in bringing
together a continent blighted by war into a union of peaceful nations, and
supported the transition of dictatorships to democracy. Together, I know we are
capable of reaching an agreement about the UK s right and obligation a. a
departing member state, while establishing a d ep and pecial partner hip that
contributes towards the prosperity, security and global power of our continent.

Yours sincerely
Theresa May


His Excellency Mr Donald Tusk

 

PMs statement to the House of Commons

Theresa May gave a statement in Parliament on her letter notifying the European Council President of the UK’s intention to leave the EU.

Thank you Mr Speaker,

Today the government acts on the democratic will of the British people. And it acts, too, on the clear and convincing position of this House.

A few minutes ago in Brussels, the United Kingdom’s Permanent Representative to the EU handed a letter to the President of the European Council on my behalf, confirming the government’s decision to invoke Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union.

The Article 50 process is now underway. And in accordance with the wishes of the British people, the United Kingdom is leaving the European Union.

This is an historic moment from which there can be no turning back. Britain is leaving the European Union. We are going to make our own decisions and our own laws. We are going to take control of the things that matter most to us. And we are going to take this opportunity to build a stronger, fairer Britain – a country that our children and grandchildren are proud to call home. That is our ambition and our opportunity. That is what this government is determined to do.

Mr Speaker, at moments like these – great turning points in our national story – the choices we make define the character of our nation. We can choose to say the task ahead is too great. We can choose to turn our face to the past and believe it can’t be done. Or we can look forward with optimism and hope – and to believe in the enduring power of the British spirit.

I choose to believe in Britain and that our best days lie ahead. And I do so because I am confident that we have the vision and the plan to use this moment to build a better Britain. For, leaving the European Union presents us with a unique opportunity. It is this generation’s chance to shape a brighter future for our country. A chance to step back and ask ourselves what kind of country we want to be.

My answer is clear. I want the United Kingdom to emerge from this period of change stronger, fairer, more united and more outward-looking than ever before. I want us to be a secure, prosperous, tolerant country – a magnet for international talent and a home to the pioneers and innovators who will shape the world ahead.

I want us to be a truly Global Britain – the best friend and neighbour to our European partners, but a country that reaches beyond the borders of Europe too. A country that goes out into the world to build relationships with old friends and new allies alike.

And that is why I have set out a clear and ambitious plan for the negotiations ahead. It is a plan for a new deep and special partnership between Britain and the European Union. A partnership of values. A partnership of interests. A partnership based on cooperation in areas such as security and economic affairs. And a partnership that works in the best interests of the United Kingdom, the European Union and the wider world.

Because perhaps now more than ever, the world needs the liberal, democratic values of Europe – values that this United Kingdom shares. And that is why, while we are leaving the institutions of the European Union, we are not leaving Europe. We will remain a close friend and ally. We will be a committed partner. We will play our part to ensure that Europe is able to project its values and defend itself from security threats. And we will do all that we can to help the European Union prosper and succeed.

So Mr Speaker, in the letter that has been delivered to President Tusk today – copies of which I have placed in the library of the House – I have been clear that the deep and special partnership we seek is in the best interests of the United Kingdom and of the European Union too.

I have been clear that we will work constructively – in a spirit of sincere cooperation – to bring this partnership into being. And I have been clear that we should seek to agree the terms of this future partnership alongside those of our withdrawal, within the next 2 years.

I am ambitious for Britain. And the objectives I have set out for these negotiations remain. We will deliver certainty wherever possible so that business, the public sector and everybody else has as much clarity as we can provide as we move through the process. It is why, tomorrow, we will publish a White Paper confirming our plans to convert the ‘acquis’ into British law, so that everyone will know where they stand.

And it is why I have been clear that the government will put the final deal that is agreed between the UK and the EU to a vote in both Houses of Parliament before it comes into force. We will take control of our own laws and bring an end to the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice in Britain. Leaving the European Union will mean that our laws will be made in Westminster, Edinburgh, Cardiff and Belfast. And those laws will be interpreted by judges not in Luxembourg, but in courts across this country.

We will strengthen the Union of the 4 nations that comprise our United Kingdom. We will negotiate as one United Kingdom, taking account of the specific interests of every nation and region of the UK and when it comes to the powers that we will take back from Europe, we will consult fully on which powers should reside in Westminster and which should be passed on to the devolved administrations.

But Mr Speaker, no decisions currently taken by the devolved administrations will be removed from them. And it is the expectation of the government that the devolved administrations in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland will see a significant increase in their decision-making power as a result of this process.

We want to maintain the common travel area with the Republic of Ireland. There should be no return to the borders of the past. We will control immigration so that we continue to attract the brightest and the best to work or study in Britain, but manage the process properly so that our immigration system serves the national interest.

We seek to guarantee the rights of EU citizens who are already living in Britain, and the rights of British nationals in other member states as early as we can. That is set out very clearly in the letter as an early priority for the talks ahead. We will ensure that workers’ rights are fully protected and maintained. Indeed, under my leadership, not only will the government protect the rights of workers, we will build on them.

We will pursue a bold and ambitious free trade agreement with the European Union that allows for the freest possible trade in goods and services between Britain and the EU’s member states; that gives British companies the maximum freedom to trade with and operate within European markets; and that lets European businesses do the same in Britain.

Because European leaders have said many times that we cannot ‘cherry pick’ and remain members of the single market without accepting the 4 freedoms that are indivisible. We respect that position. And as accepting those freedoms is incompatible with the democratically expressed will of the British people, we will no longer be members of the single market.

We are going to make sure that we can strike trade agreements with countries from outside the European Union too. Because important though our trade with the EU is and will remain, it is clear that the UK needs to increase significantly its trade with the fastest growing export markets in the world.

We hope to continue to collaborate with our European partners in the areas of science, education, research and technology, so that the UK is one of the best places for science and innovation. We seek continued cooperation with our European partners in important areas such as crime, terrorism and foreign affairs.

And it is our aim to deliver a smooth and orderly Brexit – reaching an agreement about our future partnership by the time the 2-year Article 50 process has concluded, then moving into a phased process of implementation in which Britain, the EU institutions and member states prepare for the new arrangements that will exist between us.

Mr Speaker, we understand that there will be consequences for the UK of leaving the EU. We know that we will lose influence over the rules that affect the European economy. We know that UK companies that trade with the EU will have to align with rules agreed by institutions of which we are no longer a part, just as we do in other overseas markets. We accept that.

However, we approach these talks constructively, respectfully, and in a spirit of sincere cooperation. For it is in the interests of both the United Kingdom and the European Union that we should use this process to deliver our objectives in a fair and orderly manner. It is in the interests of both the United Kingdom and the European Union that there should be as little disruption as possible. And it is in the interests of both the United Kingdom and the European Union that Europe should remain strong, prosperous and capable of projecting its values in the world.

At a time when the growth of global trade is slowing and there are signs that protectionist instincts are on the rise in many parts of the world, Europe has a responsibility to stand up for free trade in the interests of all our citizens.
With Europe’s security more fragile today than at any time since the end of the Cold War, weakening our cooperation and failing to stand up for European values would be a costly mistake.

Our vote to leave the EU was no rejection of the values that we share as fellow Europeans. As a European country, we will continue to play our part in promoting and supporting those values – during the negotiations and once they are done.

We will continue to be reliable partners, willing allies and close friends. We want to continue to buy goods and services from the EU, and sell them ours. We want to trade with them as freely as possible, and work with one another to make sure we are all safer, more secure and more prosperous through continued friendship.

Indeed, in an increasingly unstable world, we must continue to forge the closest possible security co-operation to keep our people safe. We face the same global threats from terrorism and extremism. That message was only reinforced by the abhorrent attack on Westminster Bridge and this place last week.

So there should be no reason why we should not agree a new deep and special partnership between the UK and the EU that works for us all.

Mr Speaker, I know that this is a day of celebration for some and disappointment for others. The referendum last June was divisive at times. Not everyone shared the same point of view, or voted in the same way. The arguments on both side were passionate.

But, Mr Speaker, when I sit around the negotiating table in the months ahead, I will represent every person in the whole United Kingdom – young and old, rich and poor, city, town, country and all the villages and hamlets in between.

And yes, those EU nationals who have made this country their home and it is my fierce determination to get the right deal for every single person in this country. For, as we face the opportunities ahead of us on this momentous journey, our shared values, interests and ambitions can - and must - bring us together.

We all want to see a Britain that is stronger than it is today. We all want a country that is fairer so that everyone has the chance to succeed. We all want a nation that is safe and secure for our children and grandchildren. We all want to live in a truly Global Britain that gets out and builds relationships with old friends and new allies around the world.

These are the ambitions of this government’s Plan for Britain. Ambitions that unite us, so that we are no longer defined by the vote we cast, but by our determination to make a success of the result.

We are one great union of people and nations with a proud history and a bright future. And now that the decision to leave has been made – and the process is underway – it is time to come together. For this great national moment needs a great national effort. An effort to shape a stronger future for Britain.

So let us do so together. Let us come together and work together. Let us together choose to believe in Britain with optimism and hope. For if we do, we can together make the most of the opportunities ahead. We can make a success of this moment. And we can together build a stronger, fairer, better Britain – a Britain our children and grandchildren are proud to call home.

I commend this statement to the House.

NOTA DE PRENSA

 

CASI 310.000 BRITÁNICOS EN ESPAÑA Y MÁS DE 100.000 ESPAÑOLES EN EL REINO UNIDO SE CONVIERTEN EN MONEDA DE CAMBIO EN LAS NEGOCIACIONES POST-BREXIT

 

El miércoles 8 de marzo se celebró en las Oficinas del Parlamento Europea en Madrid un coloquio, organizado por EuroCitizens, sobre las implicaciones del Brexit para la libertad de movimiento y el derecho a vivir, trabajar y estudiar de los británicos en España y los españoles en el Reino Unido.

 

Participaron ponentes españoles y británicos expertos en las áreas de sanidad, educación, jurídica y política institucional, que debatieron sobre las posibles consecuencias para los ciudadanos.

 

La Directora de la Oficina del Parlamento Europeo en Madrid, María Andrés Marín, destacó los derechos de los ciudadanos a vivir, trabajar y estudiar como un tema importante que debía formar parte de los  grandes debates políticos y de las negociaciones que empezarán cuando el Reino Unido invoque el Artículo 50.

 

310.000 británicos en España carecen de información del Gobierno británico

El Vicepresidente de EuroCitizens, Michael Harris, explicó que la Asociación  había nacido de la enorme preocupación de los británicos en España, que se sienten desamparados. No pudieron votar en el referéndum – personas que llevaban más de 15 años en Europa no tenían derecho a ello  – y tampoco han recibido ninguna comunicación del Gobierno británico. Una comisión de lores y diputados británicos que visitó España a finales de febrero “no tenía tiempo” para reunirse con miembros de EuroCitizens o las otras dos asociaciones más grandes de británicos en España, Brexpats y Bremain.

Harris explicó que el objetivo de EuroCitizens es defender los derechos de ciudadanía europea de los británicos en España y de los españoles en el Reino Unido, concretamente la libertad para residir, estudiar y trabajar en toda la Unión Europea, y que estos derechos no se pueden “trocear”.

José Montilla, Senador y Viceportavoz de la Comisión Mixta para la Unión Europea, prevé que la negociación del Brexit será larga y compleja, y de las posiciones previas del Reino Unido y de la Unión Europea, con especial referencia a  la situación de los derechos de los ciudadanos. Enfatizó la necesidad de hacer presión para llegar a un acuerdo.

(Frases a citar) "Despejar las incógnitas de la situación de los ciudadanos británicos en la UE y comunitarios en el UK ha de ser prioritario, primero las personas".

"Los acuerdos son posibles y duraderos cuando el resultado es equilibrado y ninguna de las partes se considera vencedor absoluto. Eso deseo para estas negociaciones".

Timothy Hemmings, Ministro Consejero de la Embajada Británica, habló de la variedad de talento que el Reino Unido ofrece, gracias en parte a su sistema educativo: 18 de las 100 primeras universidades del mundo están en el Reino Unido. Afirmó que los más de 130.000 españoles que viven en el Reino Unido son una parte muy valiosa y valorada de ese talento y diversidad. Defendió que, aunque el Reino Unido salga de la Unión Europea, no va a dejar Europa, quiere que los vínculos entre personas y entre empresas sigan creciendo y prosperando.

Reiteró que la prioridad para el Reino Unido es garantizar los derechos que ya tienen los ciudadanos británicos que están en la UE y los que ya tienen los ciudadanos europeos que están en el Reino Unido. En estos momentos el gobierno británico está dispuesto a llegar a un acuerdo de este tipo si los demás países están conformes.

 

 

El Brexit supone una amenaza para los derechos, no solo de británicos en España, sino también de los españoles en el Reino Unido.

Camilla Hillier-Fry, secretaria de EuroCitizens, señaló que el derecho de residencia en sí -que tampoco está garantizado – no es suficiente sin el derecho a trabajar, a estudiar, a moverse por la Unión Europea y los derechos fundamentales de representación. En la mesa redonda que trató el impacto de Brexit en estos derechos, los expertos coincidieron en señalar las repercusiones negativas para los ciudadanos.

  • Agustín Reoyo, Adjunto a la Confederación sindical CCOO para Política social y Médico de Atención primaria, detalló las repercusiones en la cobertura sanitaria que tendrá Brexit sobre distintos colectivos de británicos en España: estudiantes que se quedan sin tarjeta sanitaria, jubilados cuya pensión británica ya ha perdido un 20% de su valor por la devaluación de la libra, 60.000 profesionales británicos que cotizan en España y necesitan cobertura médica para ejercer  su profesión.  Reoyo también expresó preocupación respecto al futuro de los 5000 profesionales de la salud que trabajan en el Reino Unido que pueden ver su situación profesional en riesgo con la salida de la Unión Europea. Defendía la necesidad de llegar a un acuerdo.
  • Hay trabajadores españoles en casi todos los sectores de actividad de la economía británica, desde el sistema de salud a empresas de ingeniería, pasando por hostelería y la City. Un 25% de los empresarios británicos temen que los trabajadores comunitarios regresen a Europa; este porcentaje alcanza el 49% entre empresarios del sector sanitarios y el 43% en educación. Vanesa López-Román Pérez, miembro de Españoles en el Reino Unido, habló de la reacción y la incertidumbre que sienten los españoles en el país anglosajón. Destacó que aunque están muy preocupados, muchos tienen hipotecas e hijos y no es tan fácil volver a España.
  • La salida del Reino Unido de la Unión Europea tendrá un impacto en la educación, tanto en la homologación de títulos profesionales y académicos. En cuanto a estudios universitarios, Robert Robinson, Vicedecano de Relaciones Internacionales e Institucionales de la Universidad Pontificia Comillas, habló de las repercusiones negativas para estudiantes y especialmente para el sistema universitario británico, que perderá financiación europea, cuyos costes aumentarán, todo lo que empobrecerá la sociedad. Dada la necesidad de conservar el talento, confía que habrá “sensatez” entre los gobernantes.
  • Los británicos que han optado por hacer su vida en Europa  pierden sus derechos de ciudadanía europea, que no son derechos adquiridos. En el Reino Unido en teoría se concede la nacionalidad británica “automáticamente” a los residentes con más de 5 años, que no es el caso en España. En la práctica en ambos casos los trámites son complejos y el proceso puede durar entre dos y tres años (más que el tiempo de negociación del Brexit). La doble nacionalidad, que se admite entre algunos países, no está admitida por España, al menos con respecto a ciudadanos británicos. Ralph Smith, MBE, International Counsel, Gómez-Acebo & Pombo Abogados explicó algunas de las posibles implicaciones para británicos que viven y trabajan en España de la pérdida de sus derechos y habló asimismo de la doble nacionalidad como una cuestión, no sólo de legislación, sino también como una decisión personal.
  • La libertad de movimiento es hoy por hoy una forma de vida bajo amenaza para los 3 millones de ciudadanos europeos que viven en el Reino Unido y los 1,2 millones de británicos en Europa. Enrique Guerrero, eurodiputado y Vicepresidente del Grupo de la Alianza Progresista de Socialistas y Demócratas en el Parlamento Europeo, afirma que “la batalla está en la libre circulación de personas”. Habló de la posición del Parlamento Europeo respecto a la protección de los derechos de libertad de movimiento de los ciudadanos europeos y de que la negociación tiene que ser sensata.

 

EuroCitizens es una asociación de ciudadanos británicos en España que coordina sus acciones con otras agrupaciones de ciudadanos en Europa: "Españoles en el Reino Unido", "European Movement UK", y  el Movimiento Europeo en España, además de varias asociaciones de británicos en España, como Brexpats y Bremain. En España la red de asociaciones de ciudadanos suma ahora casi 10.000 miembros.

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